HOME      •      SEARCH      •      EMAIL    •     ABOUT


Family Oleaceae
Sampagitang-sunsong
Jasminum multiflorum (Burm. f.) Andrews
STAR JASMINE

Mao mo li

Scientific names Common names
Jasminum gracillimum Hook.f. Sampagita de China (Tag., Span.)
Jasminum multiflorum (Burm. f.) Andrews Sampagita del japon (Span.)
Jasminum pubescens (Retz.) Willd. Sampagitang-sunsong (Tag.)
Mogorium multiflorum (Burm.f.) Lam. Angel hair jasmine (Engl.)
Mogorium pubescens (Retz.) Lam. Downy jasmine (Engl.)
Nyctanthes multiflora Burm. f. Star jasmine (Engl.)
Nyctanthes pubescens Retz.  
Some compilations list Jasminum multiflorum and J grandiflorum as synonymous species; Quisumbing's compilation lists them as separate species.
Jasminum multiflorum (Burm.f.) Andrews is an accepted name The Plant List

Other vernacular names
BENGALI: Chameli, Kunda.
CHINESE: Mao mo li.
FRENCH: Jasmin des haies.
GUJARATI: Gujari.
HINDI: Ban malati, Kunda, Palind, Daladhak, Dal-kosh, Danta-patraka, Jangali chameli.
MALAYALAM: Kurukuttimulla
MANIPURI: Kundo.
MARATHI: Kunda, Ran mogra.
PORTUGUESE: Jasmineiro-do-monte, Jasmineiro-do-campo, Giesto, Jasmin-neve.
SANSKRIT: Attahasaka, Daladhaka, Kunda, Maghya, Manohara, Muktapuspa, Palinda, Tapasya.
SPANISH: Sampagita de china, Sampagita del japon, Jazmin estrellado.
SRI LANKAN: Pichcha.
TELUGU: Kundamu malle, Kundamu molla.
THAI: Malulee.
TIBETAN: Kun de.
VIETNAMESE: Nh[af]i nhi[eef]u hoa.

Botany
Sampagitang-sunsong is a climbing shrub 2 to 5 meters high. Stems are spirally twisted, covered with hairs. Leaves are ovate, 4 to 9 centimeters long, pointed at the tip and heart-shaped at the base. Flowers are white, fragrant, borne in dense, terminal, and crowded heads (cymes), 7 to 10 centimeters in diameter. Calyx is hairy, with linear lobes, and 5 to 6 centimeters long. Corolla-tube is about 1.5 centimeters long, divided into 7 to 9 lobes which are spreading, oblong, and 1.5 to 1.8 millimeters in length.

Distribution
- Cultivated in Manila and larger towns for ornamental purposes and for its fragrant flowers.
- Nowhere spontaneous.
- Native of India.

Constituents
- Study of water soluble fraction yielded 10-hydroxyoleuropein and 10-hydroxyligustroside, plus three new secoiridoid glycosides, multifloroside, multiroside, and 10-hydroxyoleoside-11-methyl ester. (See study below) (2)
- Phytochemical screening using ethanol and chloroform solvents yielded alkolide (EC), flavonoids (C), terpenoids (EC), tannins (EC), emodin (E), leucoanthocyanins (E), steroids (EC), coumarins (E), phlobatanins (E), saponins (C). (7)
- Phytochemical screening of various extracts of leaves yielded phenols, saponins, terpenoids.
- Methanol extract of
J. multiflorum yielded nerolidol (42.44%), benzyl benzoate (39.00%), and jasmolactone (12.02%); HS-SPME eluted nerolidol (76.56%), jasmone (15.31%), and hexyl benzoate (4.40%); hydrodistillation yielded hexenyl benzoate (35.89%), ß-farnesene (24.62%) and α-cadinol (14.30%). (see study below) (12)
- Study on flowers of J. multiflorum isolated a new compound, 2-p-acetoxyphenylethanol (1), along with long-chain saturated compounds n-tritetracontane (2) and heptacosane (3). (13)

Parts used
Leaves, roots, flowers.

Uses

Folkloric
- Dried leaves, soaked in water, used as poultice for indolent ulcers.
- Root is used as an antidote for snake bites.
- Flowers used as lactifuge.
- Root of the wild variety used as emmenagogue.
- Root used as emetic.
- In Kerala, India, women bandage the breasts with jasmine flowers to suppress lactation. (11)
- In India, leaf paste is used for rheumatic pain, skin sores, allergic itches, inflammation. (15)
- In Himachal Pradesh, India, leaves used for indolent ulcers. (17)
Others
- Veterinary: In Sri-Lankan veterinary medicine for cattle, flowers of J. multiflorum are pounded with inflorescence of Cocos nucifer and pericarp of Phylantus embilica with vinegar added to the mixture and used for colicky pain, twice daily. (16)

Studies
Secoiridoid Lactones / Jasmolactones / Vasodilating / Cardiotropic:
Study isolated four secoiridoid lactones - jasmolactones A,B, C, and D from the aerial part of J multiflorum. Pharmacologic testing showed B and D to possess coronary vasodilating and cardiotropic activities. (1)
Coronary Dilating / Cardiotropic:
Study of a water soluble fraction isolat
ed 10-hydroxyoleuropein and multifloroside which exhibited coronary dilating and cardiotropic activities. (2)
CNS Depressant Activities / Analgesic / Aerial Parts: Study evaluated an ethanol extract for pharmacological effects in mice. Results showed significant dose dependent potentiation of sleeping time of mice induced by standard hypnotics viz, pentobarbitone sodium, diazepam, and meprobamate. Extract also showed significant analgesic properties. (5)
Antimicrobial / Leaves: Study evaluated various leaf extracts of Jasminum multiflorum for antibacterial (Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas, and Escherichia coli) and antifungal (Aspergillus niger, Scolorotium, and Candida albicans) activity. Phytochemical screening yielded alkaloids, triterpenoids, tannins, and carbohydrates. A methanolic extract showed significant antimicrobial activity against tested organisms, but particularly more effective against A. niger, C. albicans, and E. coli. (8)
Free Radical Scavenging / Leaves: A methanol extract of leaves showed maximum antioxidant activity (81.44% activity at 500 µg/ml) compared to other extracts using DPPH method. Ascorbic acid as standard showed 97% activity. (10)
Suppression of Lactation / Flowers: A study in lactating mice showed contact with jasmine flowers (J. multiflorum) led to suppression of milk production with involution of the mammary glands. (11)
Suppression of Lactation / Flowers: Study evaluated the interspecies variation of chemical constituents and antioxidant capacity of Jasminum sambac and J. multiflorum. DPPH assay showed J. multiflorum is a better radical scavenger than J. sambac, with IC50 value of 81 µg/mL and 208 µg/mL, respectively. (see constituents above) (12)
Inhibitory Effect on Vibrio Species Causing GI Diseases: Study evaluated seven types of Indian flowers, including J. multiflorum, for its therapeutic role in the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases caused by Vibrio species (Vibrio cholera, V. alginolyticus, V. parahemolyticus). Results showed all the flower extracts showed inhibitory effect on the Vibrio species. (14)

Availability
Wild-crafted.

Last Update July 2016

IMAGE SOURCE: / Jasminum multiflorum / Forest & Kim Starr / Plants of Hawaii / Creative Commons Attribution / click on image to go to source page / alterVISTA

Additional Sources and Suggested Readings
(1)
Novel secoiridoid lactones from Jasminum multiflorum / Shen YC, Chen CH / J Nat Prod. 1989 Sep-Oct;52(5):1060-70.
(2)
Secoiridoid glycosides from Jasminum multiflorum
/ Ya-Ching Shen, Chia-Yin Lin, Chung-Hsiung Chen / Phytochemistry, Volume 29, Issue 9, 1990, Pages 2905–2912
(3)
Taxon: Jasminum multiflorum (Burm. f.) Andrews / GRIN / USDA
(4)
Kunda / Common names / Flowers of India
(5)
Evaluation of CNS Activities of Aerial Parts of Jasminum multiflorum Andr. / DILIPKUMAR PAL*, SANDIP KUMAR PAHARI and ASHISH KUMAR PATHAK / Asian Journal of Chemistry Vol. 19, No. 6 (2007), 4452-4458
(6)
Jasminum multiflorum / Synonyms / The Plant List
(7)
COMPARATIVE PRELIMINARY PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF JASMINIUM MULTIFLORUM AND JASMINUM OFFICINALE / Patil K. J., Patil V. A., Patil S.V., and Bhuktar A.S. / Trends in Life Sciences, Vol. 1 No. 3 (2012)
(8)
PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITIES OF JASMINUM MULTIFLORUM / Sharma Ankita, Sati Sushil Chandra, Rawat Suman and Tomar Arti / WORLD JOURNAL OF PHARMACY AND PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES, Volume 3, Issue 4, 735-742.
(9)
Jaminum multiflorum / Common names / efloraofindia
(10)
FREE RADICAL SCAVANGING ACTIVITY OF LEAVES OF JASMINUM MULTIFLORUM / Sharma Ankita*, Sati Sushil Chandra, Rawat Suman, Singh Dheeraj / World Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Volume 3, Issue 2, 2044-2048.
(11)
Inhibiting effect of jasmine flowers on lactation / Abraham, M., N. Sarada Devi and R. Sheela / IJMR 69, 88 / 1979
(12)
Interspecies variation of chemical constituents and antioxidant capacity of extracts from Jasminum sambac and Jasminum multiflorum grown in Malaysia / Katrina Mohamad Khidzir, Sit-Foon Cheng, Cheng-Hock Chuah / Industrial Crops and Products, Volume 74, 15 November 2015, Pages 635–641
(13)
A New Phenolic Compound from the Flowers of Jasminum multiflorum / Deepika Singh, Raghubind Kumar, P. K. Chaudhuri / Chemistry of Natural Compounds, March 2014, Volume 50, Issue 1, pp 48-49
(14)
Therapeutic role of Indian flowers in treatment of astrointestinal Diseases caused by Vibrio species / Rashmi Verma, Reena Kumari, Ruby Agnihotri, Adarsh Katiyar / Research Inventy: International Journal of Engineering and Science, Vol.3, Issue 3 (June 2013), PP 20-24
(15)
MEDICINAL PLANTS USED IN THE TREATMENT OF VARIOUS SKIN DISEASES BY THE SCHEDULED CASTE COMMUNITY OF ANDRO VILLAGE IN IMPHAL EAST DISTRICT, MANIPUR (INDIA) / Th. Tomba Singh, A. Radhapyari Devi, H. Rajanikanta Sharma and H. Manoranjan Sharma / International Science Journal, Volume- 2 Issue-2 (2015)
(16)
A REVIEW ON TRADITIONAL VETERINARY MEDICAL PRACTICES IN SRI LANKA WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CATTLE DISEASES / ERHSS Ediriweera, NGAAS Nanayakkara, OTMRKSB Kalawana, YKSSL Sugathadasa / Tropical Agricultural Research & Extension 13(3): 2010
(17)
Leafy drugs from Tehsil Joginder Nagar, District Mandi, Himachal Pradesh, India
/ Neelam Kumar*, Munish Kumar, Bandu Shamra / Research in Pharmacy 4(5): 01-10, 2014

It is not uncommon for links on studies/sources to change. Copying and pasting the information on the search window or using the DOI (if available) will often redirect to the new link page.

HOME      •      SEARCH      •      EMAIL    •     ABOUT